Paperback Release of I Ate the Cosmos for Breakfast

cosmos

Fantastic News: Many of you have written me to inquire about a paperback release of ‘I Ate the Cosmos for Breakfast’ to use for teaching. It’s here! And it is discounted for your students through Ingram. It’s not quite showing up on the Amazon search yet, but here’s a link you can use for Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0988944766 —
And here are the ISBN Numbers: ISBN-10: 0988944766
ISBN-13: 978-0988944763

YAY!

Writers series welcomes state Poet Laureates to LSC-M – Your Houston News: News

Lone Star College-Montgomery and the Montgomery County Literary Art Council’s Writers in Performance series welcomes three state poet laureates for a panel discussion and reading April 16.

The panel discussion begins at 5:30 p.m. in the General Academic Center (Building G), Room 102, at LSC-Montgomery, with the reading following at 7 p.m., also in room G-102. All events are free and open to the public.

Lone Star College-Tomball English professor and poet Melissa Studdard will conduct panel interviews on the “States of Poetry: 3 State Poet Laureates Views on Poetry in Oklahoma, Louisiana and Texas,” comparing the difference in positions . . .

Read more at:

Writers series welcomes state Poet Laureates to LSC-M – Your Houston News: News

An Interview Conducted by Sarah Marcus

from Gazing Grain Press

Sarah MarcusCate Marvin wrote of your stunning debut poetry collection, I Ate the Cosmos for Breakfast (Saint Julian Press), “In so many ways the poems in this book read like paintings, touching and absorbing the light of the known world while fingering the soul until it lifts, trembling.” Which is exactly how these poems made me feel, but I also had the sense that the “known world” was also somehow secret. The poem “In Another Dimension, We Are Making Love” ends with: “Everything we need to remember/ can fit on a scrap of paper/ smaller than your hand.” Which feels so impossible and so true! Can you tell us about this collection and your process of poem-painting?

Melissa Studdard: Of course you’re right—it’s impossible but true. What’s known touches the boundaries of secrecy, and what’s secret is also subconsciously known. That paradox, that interplay, is part of what thrills me about poetry. We can get right up to the edge of something and feel it deeply and still not fully figure it out, and that ambiguity is not only okay; it’s pleasurable. I like your phrase “poem-painting” in this context too, because in the dream-logic of poetic composition, ideas and concepts are often nestled inside images and metaphors. Therefore, we must paint poems in order to unpack the images.

In my process, a poem usually starts with a phrase or image rather than an idea. The process of writing the poem instructs me as to what it’s about. I rarely know before I begin. I’m usually just struck by something—a fist of leaves unfolding, a plastic Jesus hanging from a rearview mirror, the instant between a smile and when the smile fades—and I write until I know why the image ignited me. I often do that part of the writing with pen and paper, and then, when I figure out why I’m writing, I move to the computer so I can edit more easily as I go along.

Read the rest at Gazing Grain Press